You’re doing as much as you can to stand out at work. Not only are you proactive and dependable, but you are also a team player. Yet you got passed over for the promotion – again. What gives?

This is an unfortunate reality for many hard-working professionals. If you aren’t careful, getting passed over for a promotion can cause you to lose interest in your job. After all, how long can you stay with a company that isn’t rewarding your efforts?

Now that it has happened, you must decide whether to stay or find other opportunities in another organization. Before you make a move, there are a few things for you to consider. The following tips can help you decide how to proceed.

Handle the Situation in a Professional Manner

When you receive the news that you didn’t get the promotion, it’s only natural to become disappointed. Be careful not to let your disappointment turn into resentment toward your boss and organization.

Behave in a professional manner. Resist the urge to vent to every colleague in the office who will listen. If you must talk about your feelings, discuss them privately with your trusted board of directors.

Congratulate the colleagues who were promoted over you. Let them know you are ready to assist as much as possible. Remain cordial and upbeat when you interact with colleagues at your company.

Determine the Reasons You Didn’t Get a Promotion

The first step after getting passed over for a promotion is to determine the reasons you weren’t promoted. Schedule an appointment with your boss to get an honest assessment of your job performance.

At first, the thought of meeting with your boss might be uncomfortable. But the only way to find out how to get considered for the next promotion is to ask. Use the feedback to strengthen your skills.

Work on the Recommendations Immediately

When it comes to impacting your career outcomes, there is no time like the present. Apply the recommendations that your boss gave you – now.

Did your boss tell you that you that you need more leadership skills? Enroll in courses to strengthen your leadership skills. Ask to take the lead on projects in your company.

Find ways to add value to your boss and organization. Develop initiatives that the company can implement to save money and attract new clients. Pitch new ideas to senior level managers. Show your boss that you can excel in new roles.

Hire a Career Coach

If your career has hit a plateau, you need expert help. An experienced career coach can show you how to improve your skills, assess career opportunities and weigh your options.

Additionally, a coach can work with you to implement your manager’s recommendations as you await the next promotion cycle. Career coaches are neutral third parties. They can help you pinpoint any blind spots and work through them.

Is It Time to Go?

The ultimate responsibility for your career path lies with you. If you’ve given your all to an organization and still do not get promoted, it might be time to leave.

It’s better to find a job at another company than remain at a place that doesn’t appreciate the skills you bring to the table. Leaving your company does not mean that you are quitting. Just look at it as an opportunity to move your career in another direction.

Want to learn strategies to overcome setbacks in your legal career? At Corporate Counsel Women of Color (CCWC), our organization supports in-house attorneys who are women of color. If you are ready to connect with other women attorneys, join CCWC today.

Check out the following resources while you’re planning your next career move.

  • What Color Is Your Parachute? by Richard N. Bolles
  • Principles of Promotion: Winning Career Strategies to Get You Promoted Every Time! by Andrea Oden
  • Drive Your Career: 9 High-Impact Ways to Take Responsibility for Your Own Success by Ed Evarts

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